Anxiety & Stress

Stress and symptoms of anxiety can manifest in many different ways and may affect how you feel physically, mentally and also how you behave; this may not be always easy to identify.

However, I can help you understand what anxiety is, how to re align your thought processes and introduce coping strategies.

Stress and symptoms of anxiety can manifest in many different ways and may affect how you feel physically, mentally and also how you behave; this may not be always easy to identify.

However, I can help you understand what anxiety is, how to re align your thought processes and introduce coping strategies.

Anxiety is one of the most common mental health problems that most people will experience at some point in their lives. Despite this, it can be very difficult for those affected by it to describe to others. It can be distressing and debilitating if it starts to affect our ability to manage our everyday lives.

Sometimes people find it very difficult to know when anxiety is becoming a problem and they can get stuck in vicious cycles, finding it difficult to switch off. Indeed, if it becomes both frequent and disproportionate, anxiety can feel overwhelming and even result in someone becoming very physically and emotionally unwell.

This may result in them withdrawing from social and work situations, due to feeling incapable or inadequate.

What is anxiety?

Anxiety is a normal and necessary psychological response to many situations and an integral part of our rationalisation process when making decisions and going about our daily life. Anxiety describes feelings of unease, worry and fear and incorporates both the emotional and physical sensations we might experience when we are nervous or worried about something.

It is generally known as the ‘fight, flight or freeze’ response, which is a primitive response we have to engage us to fight, flee or freeze in response to danger.

Cortisol is a ‘stress hormone’ that our bodies release in response to anxiety. Over prolonged periods of higher cortisol levels other health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease, a lowered immune response, as well as depression and anxiety, may develop.

Symptoms of anxiety may be:

  • feelings of irritability
  • feeling light headed or dizzy nervousness
  • tense muscles and headaches
  • nausea
  • feelings of restlessness
  • difficulty concentrating
  • feelings of dread
  • impatience
  • raised blood pressure
  • churning sensations in the stomach
  • needing to go to the toilet more frequently or less frequently
  • panic attacks

Physical symptoms of anxiety may include:

  • heart palpitations
  • sweating
  • shaking
  • tightness in the chest
  • difficulty breathing
  • dizziness

Feelings may include:

  • Feeling tense, nervous and on edge
  • Having a sense of dread or fearing the worst
  • Feeling like the world is speeding up or slowing down
  • Feeling like other people can see you’re anxious and are looking at you
  • Feeling your mind is busy with thoughts
  • Dwelling on negative experiences, or thinking over a situation too much (rumination)
  • Feeling restless and not being able to concentrate

 

 

 

Self-help and seeking help for anxiety.

Ask for support – If you are feeling overwhelmed by your emotions and things are getting on top of you it is important to ask for support from family, friends and colleagues or talk to your GP or talking therapies/counsellor.

Counselling can help with this process. I can help you understand further about anxiety and how it can be managed. In addition I can help you have greater understanding of triggers and assist by put coping strategies in place to alleviate symptoms.

Talk about your feelings and connect – Being open with your friends and family can help you stay in good mental health. Social relationships are critical for promoting wellbeing and for acting as a buffer against mental health for people of all ages.

Keep Active – Exercise is essential for promoting wellbeing and is associated with lower rates of depression and anxiety across all ages. This can boost your self-esteem and help you sleep, concentration and help you feel better.

Eat well – A healthy diet is good for physical and mental health.

Drink sensibly – Heavy alcohol consumption can have a serious impact on your mood and is linked to serious health problems. It is important to know and stay within your limits.

Do Something you are good at – Finding a hobby that you are good at or simply enjoy will help release endorphins into the brain that will have a positive impact on your mood. Feeling good about yourself boosts self-esteem.

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